Maude Craig

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Artist Details

  • Maude
  • Parmley
  • Maude Parmley Maude Parmley Sumner Maude Parmley Choat
  • Craig
  • Mr. Sumner
  • Mr. Choate Mr. Craig
  • 1881
  • Pope County, Illinois
  • 1953
  • Carbondale, IL

    mid-1930s: Creal, Illinois
  • Carbondale, Illinois
  • Painter-Oil, Quilter
  • Southern Illinois Normal University
  • Array
  • 1976: Naive Art in Illinois 1830-1940, Bicentennial Exhibit Series, Illinois State Museum, Springfield, Illinois

    January 15-May 10, 2008: Fred Myers: Historic Figures & Common Men and Maude Craig, Painter: Life In A Rural Town, The University Museum, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois

    October 1, 2011-January 16, 2012: Skirting Convention: Illinois Women Artists, 1840-1940, Lakeview Museum of Arts and Sciences, Peoria, Illinois; Miss Georgia Goes to Church, circa 1935, tempera on paper; Collection of the University Museum, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale

    February 10-March 18, 2012: Skirting Convention: Illinois Women Artists, 1840-1940, Quincy Art Center, Quincy, Illinois; Miss Georgia Goes to Church, circa 1935, tempera on paper; Collection of the University Museum, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale

    May 26-September 6, 2012: Skirting Convention: Illinois Women Artists, 1840-1940Tarble Art Center, Charleston, Illinois; Miss Georgia Goes to Church, circa 1935, tempera on paper; Collection of the University Museum, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale
  • University Museum, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois
  • “Maude Parmley Sumner Craig, Artists, 1881-1953, Illinois” in Foortpints in Williamson County, Illinois, 2003 Illinois Arts Council. Naive Art in Illinois 1830-1976. Chicago: Illinois Arts Council, 1976
  • No one quite knows why Maude Parmley Craig took to painting in her fifties, but she did. She joined the art classes organized in 1935 by the Federal Art Project at Illinois Normal University in Carbondale (today's Southern Illinois University). It's likely that this was the only formal art training Maude ever had, yet she was able to capture charming hometown scenes at a time when the community—the country—needed reminders of happier days. Maude is an example of the positive effect the WPA's art classes had on many new artists during the Depression.

    Her naïve paintings attracted the attention of a researcher in the 1980s who discovered little more about her except that she made colorful quilts and woven rugs, had been married three times, and had moved to Creal Springs, not far from Carbondale, in the mid-1930s. Southern Illinois University considers her artwork treasures and maintains in their collection eight paintings and three quilt tops.

    In 1976, her paintings were displayed in an exhibition titled "Naïve Art in Illinois, 1830-1976" at the Illinois State Museum in Springfield. The exhibit catalog suggests that Maude "might easily be considered a mid-western Grandma Moses...with an eye for color."